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Joe L. Frank
1990 - 1952
1989 Inductee

Born in Mt. Rozell, Al., in 1900, Joe L. Frank  was a promoter and manager who launched the careers of some of the biggest names in country music.

He created the singing cowboy with the career of Gene Autry, and developed acts such as Roy Acuff, Eddy Arnold, Ernest Tubb and Minnie Pearl by combining radio broadcasts with personal appearances.

As a songwriter, Frank wrote "Chapel on the Hill," "Sundown and Sorrow," and "My Main Trail Is Yet To Come." Frank became ill during a business trip to Chicago and died May 4, 1952, while at the peak of his career.

Frank is the 1989 John Herbert Orr Pioneer Award recipient.

 Born in the Limestone County, Al., community of Mt. Rozell in 1900, J.L. Frank  was a promoter and manager who used many innovations to launch the careers of some of the biggest names in country music.

He combined the idea of the ruggedness of the cowboy with music, resulting in the singing cowboy, establishing the careers of Gene Autry and Pee Wee King and the Golden West Cowboys.

He managed the radio careers of acts such as Amos and Andy, and Fibber McGee and Molly. Combining Radio broadcast with personal appearances, Frank developed acts such as  Roy Acuff, Eddy Arnold, Ernest Tubb and Minnie Pearl.

As a songwriter, Frank wrote "Chapel on the Hill", "Sundown and Sorrow”, and "My Main Trail Is Yet To Come".

He has been inducted into both the Alabama Music Hall of Fame and the Country Music Hall of Fame. Frank became ill during a business trip to Chicago in 1952 and died at the peak of his career.

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