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Jerry Wexler
January 10, 1917 - August 15, 2008
1987 Inductee

Jerry Wexler, a native of New York, played a pivotal role in developing Muscle Shoals into a major recording center.

In 1966, Wexler, a partner in Atlantic Records, brought Wilson Pickett to Fame studio in Muscle Shoals where he produced the classic "Mustang Sally" and "Land of 1,000 Dances". The following year, Wexler brought Aretha Franklin to Fame to launch her reputation as "Queen of Soul."

In 1969, he committed the label to record with the fledgling Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section, producing many memorable hits on artists such as Willie Nelson, The Staple Singers, Dire Straits, and Bob Dylan.

Wexler is the 1987 John Herbert Orr Pioneer Award recipient.

Jerry Wexler, a native of New York City, crossed musical and geographical boundaries to play a pivotal role in developing Muscle Shoals into one of the major recording centers of the nation.

Beginning as a music journalist with Billboard magazine, Wexler coined the term Rhythm and Blues to replace the "Race Records" charts.

In the early 50s. Wexler joined Atlantic Records and with Ahmet and Nesuhi Ertegun built the label into one of the giants of the music industry.

His early recordings with Ray Charles, Ruth Brown and the Drifters are legendary.

In the mid-60s, he brought Wilson Pickett to Fame studio in Muscle Shoals where he produced the classic "Mustang Sally" and "Land of 1,000 Dances". Soon after he recorded Aretha Franklin's "I Never Loved A Man The Way That I Loved You" and "Do Right Woman, Do Right Man", cutting both the same day.

In 1969, Wexler committed the label to record with the fledgling Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section, enabling the ensemble to borrow funds to begin their first studio.

Among the artist recorded by Wexler in Muscle Shoals are Willie Nelson, Lulu, Cher, The Staple Singers, Dire Straits, McGuinn-Hillman, and Bob Dylan.

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